How to make your wedding even more grand in Punjabi style

In India, weddings are an extravagant affair with a lot of emphases laid on decor, food, ambience and rituals. Sikh weddings are no different. They are a celebration of the union of two families, two individuals in love and are celebrated with great pomp and show. Punjabi marriages are known for their pomp and show. Just like the opulent culture of Punjab, punjabi weddings are quite fun. Design Aqua who’ll make your day more beautiful They are conducted lavishly and celebrated with extreme gaiety. It is difficult to resist the fervour of these weddings as they comprise of traditional folk dances such as Bhangras and Giddas.

Photo: Design Aqua.
Photo: Design Aqua.

Roka

It is a small ceremony held at the girl’s home. Here, the wedding is formally accepted by both sides and is celebrated with some exchange of gifts and sweets. In Hindi, Roka means ‘to stop’ and in this respect, it is to stop the search of another partner as the perfect match is found. The date of the wedding is also decided at this juncture.

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Kurmai (Engagement)

The engagement ceremony is usually performed a week before the wedding either at the Gurudwara (holy place of the Sikhs) or the groom’s house. An Ardas (the common Sikh prayer), Kirtan (hymns from Sri Guru Granth Sahib) and a Langer (community meal) are done at the Gurudwara. If it is celebrated at home then the bride’s family presents the groom with kara, kirpan and sweets along with other auspicious things.

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Mehndi ceremony

The last major function before the wedding is decoration with temporary mehndi  tattoos. Mehndi artists are called to the houses of the boy and girl and apply mehendi to the palms of the female family members, and the hands and feet of the bride. A basket containing Bindi and bangles is handed around so girls can choose those that match the outfit they plan to wear to the wedding. The Mehandi ceremony takes place in the atmosphere of a party and you can go for Vishal Mehandi Art who will make sure how to add beautifulness in your hand. The bride and other ladies get mehndi done, on their hands and feet (most ladies get it done only on their hands but the bride gets it done on both hands and feet).

Photo: Vishal Mehandi Art.

Chunni Ceremony

In this beautiful ritual, the mother of the groom covers the bride’s head with chuuni that symbolises that she is their responsibility from now on. Gifts are exchanged followed by a lavish dinner, thumping music and dance.

Maiya

This scared ceremony is performed by both families at their respective homes wherein, they are smeared with oil and turmeric powder as a way of cleansing and purifying them before the big day. Folk songs are sung on this chaste occasion. Haldi and sangeet functions are on the same day.

Photo: Pooja Khurana.

Choora Ceremony

Both these ceremonies are performed a day or two before the wedding. The bride is adorned with intricate henna designs on her hand and feet. It is traditionally an all women function where they enjoy with folk songs and a lot of dance. In the Choora ceremony, the bride’s maternal uncle gives the bride the ‘choora’ or 21 bangles in red and cream that are bathed in yoghurt milk and rosewater. He makes the bride wear the choora and covers it with a cloth that symbolises breaking away from her family. Kaliras (silver and gold hanging ornaments) tied on the bangles by all relatives as a blessing to the bride. Pooja Khurana will dress you accordingly to your wedding theme.

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Wedding Rituals

A Sikh wedding takes place in the Gurudwara. It is a solemn affair with few rituals. After the baraat reaches the Gurudwara, the priest starts the Anandkaraj or the “ceremony of bliss” wherein, he explains the Sikh philosophy of marriage after which the couple stands for prayers (ardas).

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Phere

In a Sikh matrimony, there are only four phera around the Guru Granth Sahib (the holy book). With each circle, the bride and the groom take a vow recited by the priest. Flowers are showered on the couple as a symbol of their blessing. The wedding ends with a final prayer and distribution of the guruprasad to all the guests.

Photo: Design Aqua.

Vidaai

Vidaai marks the departure of the bride from her parental house. As a custom, the bride throws phulian or puffed rice over her head. The ritual conveys her good wishes for her parents. A traditionally sad ritual, here the bride says goodbye to her parents, siblings and rest of her family. Her brothers/male cousins then lead her to her husband, who wants to take her to his family home to begin her new life as a married woman.

Photo: Design Aqua.
On reaching the groom’s house, the mother of the boy puts mustard oil on both the sides of the entrance door. Then she performs the traditional aarti and asks the newly wed couple to come inside and seek the blessings of the God. After this, a grand Reception party is thrown by the groom’s family. This is done to give a warm welcome t the new couple.

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